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Project #1
#1
Hey people.
Since I signed up, I figure I'd at least post to explain why I've been skulking around here.

Got a free bike: Huffy Shawnee Pass, 18 Speed Index Shifting
Nothing is broken. Zero lubrication anywhere, decent frame/tubes/tires, rust attacking random parts. I've had bike repair on my bucket list for a while, and the Huffy seems like a good victim. If I fail, no harm done.

I used to own a road bike, a hybrid and a recumbent. I DIY everything but roofs, gas lines and cars, so I have a good idea of what I'm in for.

The Goal: Tear down the bike, get rid of the rust, lube everything, reassemble it. If forward movement occurs while pedaling, I'll address any specific problematic parts. This will be a "beater" bike; shorter rides where I could walk back home if it falls apart.

Time table: None. I had it sitting in the garage for a month before I took the rims off and cleaned everything.

What I expect to be learning:
--Approximate age of bike
--How to hang a bike from a ceiling (One of many tips I've already noticed here.)
--Best penetrant, lubricants, rust remover and rust removal methods
--Fixing/tweaking any parts
--Figuring out what bike-specific tools I don't need

Related tools I have:
Sockets, combo wrenches, allen wrenches, torx wrenches, hex wrenches, screwdrivers, pumps, tire levers, cable cutters, metal files. Plus an entire garage full of manly tools to use while pretending to do manly things.

Related chemicals/oils I have:
3-in-1 oil, white lithium grease, sewing machine oil, liquid wrench, metal polishers, vinegar/baking soda (for rust) and my current favorite: rust converter.

Commonly referenced bike tools I don't have:
Chain tool, chain checker, vise whip, cassette lockring tool, spoke wrenches, sprocket removal tool, bracket wrench, cone wrenches, crank extractor, cartridge bottom bracket tool and (sigh) work stand.

I should mention this is by far the longest intro I've ever written on any forum.
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#2
"[color=#333333][size=x-small]Commonly referenced bike tools I don't have:[/size][/color]
[color=#333333][size=x-small]Chain tool, chain checker, vise whip, cassette lockring tool, spoke wrenches, sprocket removal tool, bracket wrench, cone wrenches, crank extractor, cartridge bottom bracket tool and (sigh) work stand.[/size][/color]"


You do not need a chain checker - a 12" ruler works just as well.

Vise whip - yes, they are great.

Spoke wrench - get a good one for the nipples you use, and a cheap multi size one to handle other nipple sizes.

Sprocket removal tool ????

bottom bracket wrench - too many different ones to collect all of them.

Work stand - a nice to have, not needed.
Nigel
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#3
I would start with the basics and add tools as you need them for the work you will performing. If planning on working on more than one bike such as ones to flip or other peoples, I would invest in a workstand and wheel truing stand too. I have a shop workstand, a wall mount stand, bench mount stand and a portable/fold-up stand. I use the crap out of them all. Basic tools are cheap compared to buying bulk cables/housing and other things like donuts, cable crimps, cable caps and such. But are much cheaper in the long run if you are working on a lot of bicycles. I also try to stock various tubes, brake pads, levers, grips, barend plugs, stuff like I use most commonly on repairs and builds.
There are two kinds of people in the world, "Those who help themselves to people, and those who help people!"
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#4
Yeah, the tool thing. Sometimes I do projects just so I can get new tools, but I'm going to wait until this thing's back together and relatively rust free before I decide.

This whole exercise will be worth it just so I can get better at chains. I don't know how I got this lucky, but I've never had to replace one. I've never had to replace a tire on the road either, even though I've always carried tools and at least one tube.

I really miss the recumbent. Catrike. We don't live in a place where I can ride it, and had to sell it.
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#5
(12-05-2015, 03:34 AM)LostHasher Wrote:  Yeah, the tool thing. Sometimes I do projects just so I can get new tools, but I'm going to wait until this thing's back together and relatively rust free before I decide.

This whole exercise will be worth it just so I can get better at chains. I don't know how I got this lucky, but I've never had to replace one. I've never had to replace a tire on the road either, even though I've always carried tools and at least one tube.

I really miss the recumbent. Catrike. We don't live in a place where I can ride it, and had to sell it.

Hahaha,
Sounds like you already got this planned out! People like you is what makes a good community like this! To be better at chains is easy, count how many links on the current one you got, how gears on the front, how many gears on the back, and calll a chain dealer like KMC!
Use Triflow to lubricate!

Bill
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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