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Dremel - Uses and Projects with Bikes
#1
Just wanted to start a thread to see what everyone has used their Dremel for. Mostly bicycle projects and mechanical purposes. I got a Dremel 4000 as a Holiday present. Itching to use it lol.
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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#2
I have used a dremel on lots of things, everything from buffing out scratches, to shaving off metal bits or shavings. A dremel has endless uses. I recently used it on a seat tube that was giving me problems, I used the dremel to clean up the inner part of the tube and the seat post worked perfectly afterwards.
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#3
What bits did you use for the buffing? On the shaving or burrs? Did the seat tube have oxidation build up?
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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#4
Well I have a whole Dremel kit full of different bits, I have some sandpaper-like bits that do well, also some grinder type bits. Each worked well for different parts, like larger protrusions I'd use the grinder bits, and when I just needed to smooth things I'd use the sandpaper bits.
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#5
Dremel tool oh man have I ever use them I have burn out two of them over the years. Just last weekend I had to get my self a new one to cut off a new bolt that went bad on me. They are a great little tool to have around the home work shop. I use on for two years working on my Taylor Craft Model plane its a 1/4 scale I've been build model for 40 + years. They are great to work on bicycle they help you take off nuts and screws and anything else you need to they cut, grind, buffing you name it they can do the job well. If you have one use it and get your self a dremel kit to go alone with it. You can drill with it too not much they want let you do. But also be very careful with one I almost cut off my finger one time can you say OUCH ! I did lol. Well I said more than ouch lol. They are a fun tool to have I think.
My dad always told me a Sledge a matic can fix any thing.
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#6
Jeez. Could you have asked a question that had more answers?

(And these are only bike related!)

1. Stripping paint off frame.
2. Drilling hole in frame for rivnut for water bottle cage.
3. Grinding down weld on homemade truing stand.
4. Buffing frame to mirror finish.
5. Cut off top tube, downtube, and rear triangle for truing stand.
6. Buffing JB Weld.
7. Cutting seat post free from stripped bolt.

Holy crap, this is in the last week.

Do yourself a favor and get a large bit set, and you'll use it for everything.
Dedicated scholar of bicycles
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#7
I am thinking of upgrading my Dremel. I have a battery powered 7volt model and it's not keeping up with my usage.
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#8
Well, not to put down anybody's tool (That sounds so dirty), but the battery operated dremels are close to worthless. Make sure its corded, and its variable. I actually have a Northern Industrial Rotary tool, that came with some absurd amount of attachments for $44 and free shipping. Works like a charm.

*edit* Heres the link. Its no dremel, but it gets the job done.
http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product_6970_200370529_200370529
Dedicated scholar of bicycles
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#9
Yeah, mine has been good for small jobs. But when I tackle the job of cutting metal, it takes a LONG time. It cuts one braze-on for two charges.
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#10
(01-15-2010, 09:33 PM)Jordan300 Wrote:  Yeah, mine has been good for small jobs. But when I tackle the job of cutting metal, it takes a LONG time. It cuts one braze-on for two charges.

Meh. I tear through a top tube in 10 - 12 seconds, if I take my sweet ass time. Make the upgrade. Its the most versatile tool you'll ever buy.
Dedicated scholar of bicycles
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#11
WAT! 10 to 12 sec ! wow, I am gonna upgrade.
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#12
(01-16-2010, 01:31 AM)Jordan300 Wrote:  WAT! 10 to 12 sec ! wow, I am gonna upgrade.

Ok, apparently I over exaggerated a bit. I timed myself on a top tube just to make sure I wasn't lying, and I was. It took me a little under 30 seconds.

It's amazing how your mind can play tricks on you when you're trying to pump up a product. Still, approx 30 seconds with a cheaper rotary tool and cheap cut off wheel ain't bad. It took me longer with my hacksaw.

Maybe get a Dremel brand when you upgrade though. I hear they have better torque than most.
Dedicated scholar of bicycles
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#13
If you are going to upgrade and stay with Dremel get the 4000 as it has been really good. Most of the attachments that you already have will fit it. Here is a little email I got back from dremel....
Thank you for writing to Dremel.


All of the current Dremel rotary tool attachments (listed below) are compatible with the new Dremel 4000. This is a brand new tool and our site / packaging is still being updated to reflect the change.

MS400 MultiSaw
PL400 Planer
220 WorkStation
225 Flex Shaft
231 Shaper/Router Table
335-01 Plunge Router
565 & 566 cutting kits
568 grout kit
575 Right Angle
670 MiniSaw
675 Lawn & Garden Tool Sharpener
677 Dremelite
678-01 Circle Cutter
1453 Chain Saw Sharpening Attachment
2500-01 MultiVise
4486 Dremel Chuck


If there is anything else we can help with please let us know. You may also call Dremel customer service at 1-800-437-3635.

Kind Regards,

(NAME REMOVED)
DREMEL / RotoZip
Consumer Care Services
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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#14
Good to know, thanks!
Dedicated scholar of bicycles
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#15
I have worn out 2-3 Dremel units over the past 30 years. The carborundum cutting wheels are the most valuable bits in my opinion. They will cut or shape any hard material including glass and titanium. Always wear eye protection when using the brittle cutting wheels as when then explode they naturally produce wedge shaped projectiles that fly in the plane that contains your eye. Also, the cutting wheels produce micro dust made up of carborundum plus what ever material you are cutting. Don't breath this dust and don't let it get near your bearings or any electronics. Strongly suggest a foot switch or foot speed control. I no longer hand hold my Dremel, I use a flex shaft with hand piece--more precise cutting with just a little loss due to friction. The cutting wheels can instantly cut a screwdriver slot in the head of a stripped philips, hex, torx, etc. when other means of removal fail.
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#16
(01-16-2010, 04:04 PM)j beede Wrote:  I have worn out 2-3 Dremel units over the past 30 years. The carborundum cutting wheels are the most valuable bits in my opoinion. They will cut or shape any hard material including glass and titanium. Always wear eye protection when using the brittle cutting wheels as when then explode they naturally produce wedge shaped projectiles that fly in the plane that contains your eye. Also, the cutting wheels produce micro dust made up of carborundum plus what ever material you are cutting. Don't breath this dust and don't let it get near your bearings or any electronics. Strongly suggest a foot switch or foot speed control. I no longer hand hold my Dremel, I use a flex shaft with hand piece--more precise cutting with just a little loss due to friction. The cutting wheels can instantly cut a screwdriver slot in the head of a stripped philips, hex, torx, etc. when other means of removal fail.

Good advice! I second wearing eye protection. I actually wear a face shield that covers my neck too, only because I caught a piece of cuttoff wheel in the neck and cut myself. Nothing serious, but a larger chunk 2 inches to the left, and I might have been in trouble.
Dedicated scholar of bicycles
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#17
I just found some sweet clear glasses out on the trail (of all places) and I have been using them as eye protection. They work great. I actually forgot to put them on last night when I started working and the first swipe at the frame, Bam! something went right into my eye.
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#18
(01-16-2010, 06:03 PM)Jordan300 Wrote:  I just found some sweet clear glasses out on the trail (of all places) and I have been using them as eye protection. They work great. I actually forgot to put them on last night when I started working and the first swipe at the frame, Bam! something went right into my eye.

Thats how it works. Its fun and bikes till someone puts an eye out.
Dedicated scholar of bicycles
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#19
Ouch! Yup I use the safety goggles as well.
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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#20
Bill. where have you been? I haven't seen you posting for a day or two! Or is it my imagination?
Dedicated scholar of bicycles
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