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Does anyone have a pneumatics system in there shop?
#1
I was thinking about getting a small compressor for my shop for various things like pumping tires, cleaning things, etc
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#2
Well there are a few choices out there. The most inexpensive one I found is from Campbell Hausfeld which is a 1gal pancake style. From experience its nice but runs a lot and it is loud. In fact I took it back last night to Walmart, because it is not enough for what I do. Right now I am looking at the 26gal Kobalt. If you look around and please do like I am doing now read the reviews on all air compressors that you look at. There really is not much difference in the 2 or 3 gallon either from the 1 gal. At least get a 5.5 or higher gallon capacity tank you will thank me.
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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#3
Did I get you two looking for a air compressor? Well if I did I got mine from sears years ago its a gas power one 5.5hp with a 30 gal tank Has work very well for me but now I am looking to buy a new one. It may be the big 60 gal campbell hausfeld 220 volt. I know its a lot of compressor but I can use it to work on my truck as well I have a lot of air tools so this can be a fun tool as well. But the cost of it WOW but it should last me the rest of my life anyway lol. Which might not be long after I bring it home=wife lol...
My dad always told me a Sledge a matic can fix any thing.
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#4
Yeah, I see how easy it is for them in the shop to just pump up tires very quickly. I've also seen a lot of the cool things you can use them for. I saw a gigantic compressor at a yard sale last week and I regret not buying it, now that I have priced them new.
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#5
Every good shop I've worked in has a compressor, usually in the back room by the solvent tank. Pumping high-pressure water with it is also handy. It's obviously awesome for inflating tires, but I love it for doing drivetrain baths. Just soak the parts in solvent for 30 minutes, scrub with a brush, blast with water and then compressed air before hang drying. Then lube all the pivots with tri-flow. Best method I've seen yet.
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#6
Oh, the pot is getting sweeter.
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#7
Curse my apartment's small basement! I need a good job and a house with garage and a basement with a workshop.
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#8
Alex,
Which compressor do you have and what kind of air tools you use with it?
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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#9
I don't have a compressor now, just when I've worked in shops (don't know what kind they were). Wish I could run one in my apartment lol.
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#10
Oh my bad lol. Other then the loud noise there are the small capacity ones.
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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#11
Yeah, Regarding the noise, I'd like to tuck one away in my laundry room and run the hose over to my shop (10ft).
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#12
Well I went and got the 26 gallon Kobalt. Came with a lot of tools and despite the bad reviews and research which clearly states the things it can and cannot do I will find out. Really a decent sized compressor for and my needs, but I will find out how good it really is.
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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#13
UPDATE: I tried every tool that came with it and pumped up two bike tires. I truly am impressed with its operation, it will definitely be a valuable asset as mentioned. In a different post KDC mentioned a airbrush kit and it is tempting Wink . I thought mine came with a sprayer but it was a different tank that I was looking at, no big deal because they aren't that much.
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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#14
Sorry to bump this thread back up, but wanted to add a few things about a shop air system. When I was looking around I found it necessary to tally up all the possible tools and their CFM (cubic feet per minute) demand that I would use on the compressor. Typically a paint gun will use 4 cfm where a sander will use 15 to 20 cfm. If you buy a compressor rated at say 9cfm at 90psi then it is easy to calculate that said compressor is too small for your needs and the compressor will run all the time to try to maintain pressure. It all depends upon your needs.

In addition, compressors come in two "flavors," oil-less and those with oil lubrication. The oil-less compressors are much louder.

After shopping around a few months ago I bought a Campbell-Hausfeld (labeled as Farmhand) 4 HP, single-stage, 3-cylinder with a 60 gallon tank at a rock bottom price of $540. They are typically twice that price. My needs include a sander and paint gun.

Steve
Junkyard Tools rescued from the junkyard!
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#15
YES! That is what I'm talkin' about! That thing is sweet. I want to put together a shop so bad.
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#16
Hi Steve,

That is a very nice compressor! I also like how you have the electrical breaker hooked up Smile . As far as your math that is totally correct. I am sure in time I will use the impact wrench, air hammer, and air ratchet, but for now I really only use it for small jobs. Blowing off parts, pumping up bicycle tires, and a few others. I am currently looking for a good airbrush accessory and small paint gun. So the 26gal Kobalt I have is awesome. Oiless compressors are loud lol, but I put my ear plugs in and it sounds like a kitten purring Tongue . A little trick I picked up when blowing off small parts is to put the needle inflater in the blow gun and it gives a nice stream of air but doesn't use much air.

Anyways bet yours was pretty heavy?
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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#17
(01-15-2010, 03:45 PM)Bill Wrote:  Hi Steve,
That is a very nice compressor! I also like how you have the electrical breaker hooked up Smile .
Anyways bet yours was pretty heavy?

Thanks Jordan and Bill.

The new electrical box was necessary because I also needed a 220v 50-amp breaker for the welder, a 220 v. 30-amp breaker for the compressor and a 20-amp 110v outlet for common tools. So the sub box is 100 amps total coming out of a 200-amp household box.

I had to enlist a friend with an engine hoist to pick up the compressor since it weighs 300 pounds. And they don't have any handles on the darn things. Smile

Yes, I wouldn't spend any more money on a compressor than what you will need.

Thanks again,
Steve
Junkyard Tools rescued from the junkyard!
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