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Torque wrench choices ... confusing ...
#1
Being a casual rider, I don't intend to do too much of my own maintenance. However, I do want to do some basics ... chain cleaning, derailleur adjustments, brake pad replacement ... stuff like that. My owner's manual indicates most of the adjustments and replacements I'm likely to do will require a torque wrench capable of torquing up to a maximum of about 8-10 Nm.

Problem is ... the beam-style bicycle-oriented wrenches I'm seeing either max out at around 7 Nm or around 70Nm. The 7 Nm wrench doesn't measure high enough and the 70 Nm wrench measures so high I'm concerned I won't be able to accurately use it for small (8-10 Nm) measurements. Ideally, I'd like to find a beam-style wrench that tops out around 15 Nm but I can't seem to locate one. I won't use one frequently enough to justify getting a click-style or electronic (too much $$$ for me).

Any suggestions?
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#2
You are exactly right. Welcome to the torque wrench conundrum. Rarely will a single wrench provide the desired range of torque. I would suggest you stay away from the micrometer type with the twist grip. These wrenches have poor repeatability and need to be reset to zero when stored. Sears has a strain gauge (electronic) wrench that goes on sale for $179 now and then. Good luck.
...j
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#3
The best luck I've had is having 2 beam type wrenches. One for the small stuff (stems, seatpost bolts, etc.), and one for the big stuff (pedals, cranks, bottom brackets, etc.).

Some people are super serious about getting the torque "just right", but really, so long as it's close, you're fine. Most companies just take maximum torque they put on a bolt and cut it by 20%.
Dedicated scholar of bicycles
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#4
I didn't get to finish that lost post...

Since a majority of the companies out there generalize the torque specifications, even carbon parts, I see no need to torque to the EXACT inch pound.

Get it close and you'll be fine.
Dedicated scholar of bicycles
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#5
Ill simply give you all this link.
http://www.stockcarracing.com/howto/scrp_0803_calibrating_a_torque_wrench/index.html
How to calibrate a torque wrench.
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#6
Resurrecting an older thread... I just found a "new-old-stock" beam-type torque wrench on a major internet auction site with a 0-200 inch-pound scale, 3/8 drive.

It's made by New Britain, an old Connecticut based tool company that hasn't been around for awhile, and it's a good quality made-in-USA tool.

The 0-200 inch pound scale is perfect for a bike, as it translates to metric range of 0-22 NM . It's model TWI-200, and goes for around $65 with shipping. There's also a 0-100 in/lb model for sale.

I like the idea that the beam type wrenches don't need calibration like the click-type wrenches, and it's hard to find a quality click-type wrench for under $100.
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