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How do I use this hub?
#1
Anyone recognize this unmarked hub? It seems to be a sealed bearing type and spins very nicely. I would like to use it to build a radial spoked front wheel--I've not built a wheel before. I had planned to start with a simple standard low flanged hub but this is the hub I have. I don't even know how to load a spoke in this hub. Once I figure out what sort of hub this is I hope to find a spoke length calculator and be on my way.
...j
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#2
Where did you get that hub anyway? Good luck on building a wheel.
My dad always told me a Sledge a matic can fix any thing.
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#3
Wow, the only way that I would see to insert the spoke is to take it apart, then going from the axle side up through the spoke hole. I actually like the design because whoever made this hub eliminated the flanges. Suppose it could have bad advantages too. Just make sure you get high end spokes because if one breaks it is gonna have to be taken apart again.
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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#4
UPDATE: Ok after searching around here and there it seems to be what is called an Astral Hub by KHE Bikes. http://www.khebikes.com/cms/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=664&Itemid=229
Not much information there but atleast you may be able to email them with questions.
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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#5
The manual says you have to remove the axle stud and then the protective cap to replace a spoke. I think it is safe to assume that this is also the way to lace it. In order to lace it radially you have to get straight pull spokes, though. I don't know how readily available those are. For off road use I'd probably lace it cross three or maybe cross two anyway.
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#6
(01-25-2010, 12:52 PM)Bill Wrote:  UPDATE: Ok after searching around here and there it seems to be what is called an Astral Hub by KHE Bikes. http://www.khebikes.com/cms/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=664&Itemid=229
Not much information there but atleast you may be able to email them with questions.

Thanks, that gives me a path to try. This hub that came off a Cannondale road bike. I'll see if Cannondale knows anything about it.
...j
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#7
There ya go! Sorry so short, arranging my shop.
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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#8
I don't know what application you intend to use this hub for, but if you go radially laced, just remember, rim brakes only. No disc brakes.

I know you said it came off a road bike, and will probably go back on a road bike, but you never know.Wink
Dedicated scholar of bicycles
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#9
It is going back on a road bike... but thanks for the heads up. I am still looking for rebuild details, spoke length calculator and spokes for this hub. Do you guys buy spokes (retail) on-line? Where? Frankly I am losing my enthusiasm for this hub and may simply buy a low end 20h front hub for this first wheel. Any suggestions for a 20 hole FH?
...j
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#10
Try emailing cycleruk and/or JoeB I do believe they have done a few wheels and have some resources. Alex may too. As far as anyone else I don't know.
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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#11
Spoke length calculator: look at Sheldon Brown's page for suggestions or look at http://www.wheelpro.co.uk/spokecalc/ or at http://www.dtswiss.com/Products/Components/Spokes.aspx there is a spoke calculator somewhere. Also take a look at http://www.extralite.com/Products/wheel%20build%20sx.htm for lacing patterns with straight pull spokes (dunno if that's applicable, though).

Spokes: more complicated if you want to go with straight pull. At least Sapim has them on their homepage (in contrast to DT). List of distributors: http://www.sapim.be/index.php?st=agents Or go with normal elbowed spokes.
I buy some online, some at the LBS. I have good experience with DT and with Sapim, basically any big company should be ok. Note that you sometimes only get bundles of 72 spokes online, the LBS might look more expensive but if you take into account that you use only 20 of them, they are cheaper.
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#12
Just a correction I meant to put Joe_W not JoeB Sorry Joe.
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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#13
I answered anyway ;-)
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#14
From the geometry of this hub it sure looks like it requires straight pull spokes. Is it std practice to use a elbow style spoke in radially laced wheel with a hub of this sort? The tension in the spoke would be trying to straighten out the bend? I will check the sites mentioned for spokes, length calculator and wheel building help.
...j
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#15
No, it is not. Look at the manual http://www.khebikes.com/cms/images/stories/support/manual/astral_manual.pdf Their English is even more shaky than mine, but their German is ok Wink
- Radial lacing: straight pull spokes
- cross lacing: elbowed spokes

And: No, I wouldn't try to straighten elbowed spokes. I once learned that you cannot "unbend" metal. You can only add another kink. Every bend and kink weakens the metal if it is not done right.

Wheel building book: http://www.wheelpro.co.uk/wheelbuilding/book.php
Get it, it's great. (No, I won't get tired of advertising this book, I'm not affiliated, just a very happy reader)
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#16
Heh, you could always use these: http://www.ebikestop.com/fulcrum_red_metal_5_front_leftrear_right_black_spoke_and_nipple-SP6109.php

but then you're looking at $100 + shipping for aero spokes.Big Grin

Actually, judging by the prices on the interweb, these are NOT cheap. $100 is on the cheap side for these spokes.

Good luck.
Dedicated scholar of bicycles
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#17
Hm, as an alternative, you might think about lacing it cross two, you use elbowed spokes for that on this hub. Though I've got to admit that it would look better radially laced. If I had this hub, I'd drop Sapim (or one of their distributors) an email or nag my local bike shop to contact them and get those spokes. I'd probably use something like the Mavic CXP 33 rim with Aero spokes laced radially. Should look good on a road bike...
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#18
Watch it with the aero spokes. They are aerodynamic, but not if twisted during installation or truing.

Granted, you probably wouldn't notice unless a lot of them were twisted. But still, you aren't buying them to REDUCE aerodynamic efficiency. I hold them with an adjustable wrench while I turn the nipple. That keeps them in line.

My brother keeps harping on me about making sure the spokes are straight after I do my tension relieving, but they don't turn at all during the relieving process. Just make sure if you relieve tension with the parallel spoke squeeze method, wear gloves with aero spokes.
Dedicated scholar of bicycles
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#19
Spokes should not turn during the relieving process. The relieving process is to reduce tension in the spokes, in order to do that, you have to apply more tension. The metal will then deform inelastically (in contrast to elastic deformation). The stress in the metal is greatly reduced. Spokes should be "untwisted" when tensioning them. With old spokes, there is usually enough grime on them do see how far they are turned when turning the nipple. I usually turn the nipple wrench about 1/8 turn further than I would have to and then turn it back, so that there is no torsion on the spokes. That means you are doing it right.

I use a small piece of hardwood with a slit in one side to keep aero spokes aligned, it is a piece about 2.5 cm x 6cm x 1.5cm, the slit is in the 6x1.5 surface, about 1cm deep and just wide enough for the aero spokes on my Mavic wheels.
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#20
(01-24-2010, 11:16 PM)j beede Wrote:  Anyone recognize this unmarked hub? It seems to be a sealed bearing type and spins very nicely. I would like to use it to build a radial spoked front wheel--I've not built a wheel before. I had planned to start with a simple standard low flanged hub but this is the hub I have. I don't even know how to load a spoke in this hub. Once I figure out what sort of hub this is I hope to find a spoke length calculator and be on my way.
...j
I used this spoke length calculator http://www.iforsw.com, it is for Apple iPod and iPhone but maybe for other OS (Android ???). It is really intuitive.
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