Bicycle TutorBicycle Tutor

Show off your bike!

Penetrating oils ratings
#1
I see a lot of riders DIY with stucken parts so I thought I'd post this info for all.

Its great to do it yourself get the right tools and than you will have them for the next time.

If possible take the bike to a friendly LBD and ask what tools you need as there are many different ones. Good fixinn yo all.

BTW sure be nice to see more members list location in FAQ to see just how worldwide we are.

If you have WD40 or other penetrant try that if no go try a better one and tap the part a few times.Let sit overnight.

Machinist's Workshop magazine actually tested penetrants for break
out torque on rusted nuts. Significant results! They arranged a subjective
test of all the popular penetrants with the control being the torque
required to remove the nut from a "scientifically rusted" environment.

Type of penetrating oil ..... Average load

None ................................ 516 pounds

WD-40 ............................ 238 pounds

PB Blaster .......................214 pounds

Liquid Wrench .............. 127 pounds

Kano Kroil .................... 106 pounds

ATF-Acetone mix......... 53 pounds

The ATF-Acetone mix was a "home brew" mix of 50 - 50 automatic
transmission fluid and acetone.

Note the "home brew" was better than any commercial product in this
one particular test. A local machinist group mixed up a batch and all now
use it with equally good results. Note also that "Liquid Wrench" is about as
good as "Kroil" for about 20% of the price.
Never Give Up!!!
Reply
#2
Hey George,
Very interesting information. I noticed it says pounds, how that applied foot pounds?
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
Reply
#3
I got this info from my motorcycle list and have not read the article. I can think of no other practical torque measurement in this range besides ft lbs. It does state "torque required." Never seen a 516 inch lbs torque wrench. :-)))

I am using liquid wrench since its inexpensive and readily available in USA. Night before disassembly I spray all nuts and bolts.

Kroil is great but hard to find and expensive. However it is recommended by my mechanics.

The ATF acetone mix in spray bottle is great but for now its just easier to buy LW. Its also hard to get it pin point as you can with the aerosol nuzzle straws.
Never Give Up!!!
Reply
#4
PS Bill after thinking about it, yes I understand where you are coming from. The 516 lbs of torque figure is tremendous as well as the 53 Lbs. so they must be testing industrial size fasteners.

So for now best I can say that it takes 10X as much torque w/o penetrant as it does with a the acetone ATF mix.

I'll ask on my motorcycle list to see to see if the original poster has more DATA.
Never Give Up!!!
Reply
#5
Yea that is where I was coming from because that is a lot of torque even a big guy who works on heavy equipment like the Earth Movers and such. Please do keep me informed.
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
Reply
#6
Thanks, I kinda like the idea of making the "home brew" since I have been primarily using wd-40. And I have the ingredients in my normal household inventory anyway.

Thanks George, Smile
Steve
Junkyard Tools rescued from the junkyard!
Reply
#7
Ye, 10-4 to that Bill and KC. Did not get more info on my motorcycle list.

I always spray the bolts a night before disassembly. I now use Liquid Wrench instead of WD. I like the pressurized and pin point application through the straw.

However for larger areas or with proper applicator ( such as a brush or a pump spray bottle) home brew sounds good. Especially if you use it frequently as you do KC restoring those old bikes, saves $$$$. :-)))

Interesting to see this thread back after all this time. Its good info.
Never Give Up!!!
Reply
#8
(07-14-2010, 05:49 PM)GeorgeET Wrote:  . . . Did not get more info on my motorcycle list.

I saw what you posted, thanks. Beemers are nice and smooth. My brother-in-law used to have one back in the 80s.

Steve
Junkyard Tools rescued from the junkyard!
Reply


Forum Jump:



ISSN 1918-3445 © Copyright 2007-2010 Bicycle Tutor / Privacy Policy / Created by Alex Ramon

feed