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Vintage Bianchi
#21
(02-07-2010, 04:38 PM)DaveM Wrote:  
(02-06-2010, 07:29 PM)jr14 Wrote:  The only reason to keep them is to maintain the originality of the bike, or you are nostalgic about them.

Or because they work fine.
Frankly, by your criteria, the entire bike is "obsolete" and might as well be thrown out or ridden only for nostalgia. I have to disagree completely. These are great bikes, well worthy of being ridden based on their performance alone and not just because they are vintage. I don't mean to get combative, I just get a bit huffy when people insist that something old is useless or that tiny incremental improvements in perceived performance mean that anything of an earlier design has been rendered unridable. Let's see which lasts longer, this bike or some 14 lb. carbon racer where the frame begins to delaminate after a couple years, the brakes and shifters need replacement after a couple specs of dust get in them, and a critical part shatters because someone tightened a bolt without using an aerospace grade torque wrench.

Ah. You misunderstood what I was saying, and frankly, you are getting quite combative and defensive.

What I said, was that cantilever brakes were obsolete. And they are. There is no doubt they are completely useless when compared to v-brakes.

This doesn't mean you shouldn't use them. You should, because they work fine.

If they fail however, and a new set is needed, what would be the point of compromising safety by going with cantilevers again? That makes no sense, other than nostalgia. You are completely and utterly wrong in this regard. And in this area, the performance upgrade between cantilever to v-brake is not incremental, it is astronomically better performance.

As for your point about frame materials, steel is great. Its easy to work with, comes in lots of different butting and thickness options, and its easy to weld. Aluminum is lighter, comes with the same amount of options for butting and thicknesses, but its harder to weld because you need a TIG welder to do it right.

Now carbon fiber. You also couldn't be more wrong about carbon fiber. There is no reason, except one, which I will touch upon later, why all bikes shouldn't be made of carbon fiber. It's lighter, it's stronger, it has stronger fatigue resistance than aluminum, it's tougher, it handles temperature extremes better, its becoming less and less expensive, and any number of other reasons it is better than metal. Any good carbon fiber will not delaminate as you suggest over a couple years, because if it is infused properly, there are no layers to delaminate, the part is all one layer. You are thinking of some gear head carbon fibering his dashboard and watching it delaminate in the sun, not a high quality bike made correctly. The ONLY reason not to go with carbon fiber, is that if it does break or crack, you really shouldn't attempt to repair it. But damage this severe is uncommon, just like a crack in a metal frame. Dispensing this kind of advice is seriously limiting the knowledge of all the people reading on this forum, just because you have something against technology.

You are inhibiting the education of everyone here.Sad
Dedicated scholar of bicycles
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#22
Enjoy the bike the way it is. Replace the brake pads for safety and the tires if they are cracked. If the wheels roll smoothly don't worry about them right away. The state of the art components will save a few seconds per mile, but at what cost? The bike works as well as it did when new, and that's pretty good.
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#23
Quote:Enjoy the bike the way it is. Replace the brake pads for safety and the tires if they are cracked. If the wheels roll smoothly don't worry about them right away. The state of the art components will save a few seconds per mile, but at what cost? The bike works as well as it did when new, and that's pretty good.

Agreed. That is a great bike just the way it is. Some minor repairs/maintenance and you'll be rolling smoothly for years to come!
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#24
(02-07-2010, 09:08 PM)Alex Ramon Wrote:  
Quote:Enjoy the bike the way it is. Replace the brake pads for safety and the tires if they are cracked. If the wheels roll smoothly don't worry about them right away. The state of the art components will save a few seconds per mile, but at what cost? The bike works as well as it did when new, and that's pretty good.

Agreed. That is a great bike just the way it is. Some minor repairs/maintenance and you'll be rolling smoothly for years to come!

And I'll enjoy having my old friend back on the road, which for a long time I never thought was possible. For many years, I thought I should sell it or give it away, that I'd never ride it again, but never say never, right? Smile Now, if you'll excuse me, I have a pretty blue bike to tune up. Smile The road awaits!
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#25
(02-07-2010, 06:11 PM)jr14 Wrote:  You misunderstood what I was saying, and frankly, you are getting quite combative and defensive.

What I said, was that cantilever brakes were obsolete. And they are. There is no doubt they are completely useless when compared to v-brakes.

This doesn't mean you shouldn't use them.

Sorry if I came off combative, certainly not my intention. Respectfully, I disagree with what you said.

I'm a little confused by the above statement. So canti brakes are "obsolete" and "completely useless", but that "doesn't mean you shouldn't use them"? By the precise definition of "obsolete" you may be right. But I don't think this is a clear statement. I took the OP's first post to be partially saying "is this bike so old and out of date I shouldn't bother trying to get it ridable again?" I think we all agree that the answer to that question is no. When you stated that the brakes she has "are utterly and completely obsolete." Without more information, one might take that to mean that they should not ride a bike with these brakes on it. Perhaps it would be more accurate to write, "this type of brake has been replaced by V-brakes which perform better." I think you should not assume that a reader will take an overly zealous statement the wrong way. I agree v-brakes are better, though I suspect we might argue on how big the improvement is.

I am not anti-technology, I have a carbon bike I love, I use STI levers, etc. i just don't like someone with a very good bike being told that it is obsolete or that she won't be able to find tires for it (by another poster). I just disagree with these statements and would worry a bit that making them would turn someone off to getting back on their bike that they had obviously been off for many years.

Regarding carbon frames, you may be right that I engaged in a bit of hyperbole myself. Fair enough. Carbon frames are excellent, at least the good ones are. But I don't think steel should be abandoned just because there is a better, but more expensive replacement. And I'm not convinced that carbon is superior for any and all applications. I won't ride carbon forks because if they fail, they fail catastrophically instead of bending. I know two people injured badly when their carbon forks failed without warning. Now these may have been inferior forks, but that is hard for the average person to determine.

Over the years I've seen a lot of people with fine bikes be told that they should buy a new high end racing bikes because they are "better" regardless of whether or not they they would be appropriate for the kind of riding that person would do and with complete disregard for cost issues. I love technological improvements. I just reject the consumerist culture of throwing out anything that is not latest and greatest. But this is all just an opinion. Feel free to debate or just shake your head at my foolishness...
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#26
Sorry it took so long to repost. Just because a technology has been rendered obsolete, that doesn't mean you shouldn't use it or ride it. It's like saying you shouldn't drive your old classic Mustang because someone told you a Subaru has made it obsolete. The technology of a Subaru has made the technology of the Mustang obsolete, but that doesn't mean the Mustang won't run, or drive fine.

But you are right I should have just said that v-brakes perform better, and when the canti's fail, you should consider an upgrade to v-brakes for safety concerns. Maybe then this debate wouldn't have happened.
Dedicated scholar of bicycles
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#27
(02-01-2010, 10:26 PM)BikeCrazyAgain Wrote:  After many years off the bike, any bike, I'm back and having a blast. At the moment, I'm riding an inexpensive no-name mountain bike with road tires, but I have a Bianchi Randonneur that I bought new in the early 80s that's been in storage for more years than I care to admit. It's been in a bike box and sheltered, so it's in good shape, but obviously needs a total overhaul before I ride it.

I have two questions:

1. Are bike components consistent enough that if my Bianchi needs parts, I can find the rights ones?

2. Is it even remotely possible to get specs for a bike this old?

Thanks,
Patty

Hi, I also own a early model Bianchi, "Limited" late 80's early 90"s. I just got back into riding after a long break; kids, career, etc and I am thoroughly enjoying myself. After a 12 year layoff, I took my bike to a local shop for tune up and a good once over to make sure everything was fine. The bike shop loved the bike, its been kept is great shape over the years.

Now that I am a little older, I want a little help with the hills and looked to upgrade some of the components. Unfortunately, my Bianchi has the Uniglide Freehub so I was not able to upgrade without spending a tremendous amount of money. I will keep the bike as originally purchased and I am looking for a new bike with more favorable gearing for the hilly area I live in.

Good luck with your old steed. With the help of your local bike shop, you will be able to enjoy many years of riding to come.

Greg D
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#28
(02-06-2010, 07:29 PM)jr14 Wrote:  The reason you don't see canti's on new bikes is because they are utterly and completely obsolete. The only reason to keep them is to maintain the originality of the bike, or you are nostalgic about them.

As for working very well, they do offer a level of modulation that isn't QUITE there with v-brakes, and no where close on disc brakes. Of course, if you have a carbon fork, the flexing of the fork can cause HUGE issues with canti's.

Obsolete?
Cantilevers are not obsolete and are still made:-
http://www.spacycles.co.uk/products.php?plid=m2b0s101p1061

This bike wouldn't work very well with "V" brakes as there isn't enough pull with the levers.
Also this bike doesn't have a carbon fork or disc brakes so thats irrelevant.
[font=Trebuchet MS]Ride hard or ride home alone![/font]
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#29
Hmm I wonder what the Roller Cam brakes were like?
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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#30
That's a really great bike.
The frame tubing is "Magni" and is a Japanese tube equivalent to 531. Looking at all the little details you can appreciate how well it's built.
Because it is built with "lugs" then that would limit how small the bike could be made.
Considering it's getting on for 20+ years old, it would satisfy todays version of an Audax bike. ("Audax" and "Sportif" are latest fashion here in the UK.)
I notice it has a triple chainset so should be a bit easier to get up the climbs.
Leave the bike as it is until you have to replace whatever.
Modern stuff such as combined brake/shifters are great for quick shifting gears but that is not what this bike was designed for.
Its role in life is for long comfortable rides over many miles. It also has mudguard eyes so fenders could be fitted for those wet road days.
Talking of water, I see it has a fluted seatpost. I would swap that for a "normal" post as the flutes let rain into the seat tube which leads down to the bottom bracket. (especially with having to have the seat so low)
The bottom bracket will possibly still be the unsealed type so will not like water in there.
The flutes were just a "fashion" and added really nothing to lightness etc.
Concerning the tires- If they have been in the dark all the time then they may still be good?
I would pump them up to a high pressure and see if there are any bulges or rotted sections.
Any concerns then bin them and get new rubber.
[font=Trebuchet MS]Ride hard or ride home alone![/font]
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#31
Hi Patty,

That is an awesome bike! If I ever run across one for sale I'll compare it to yours. Smile

Steve
Junkyard Tools rescued from the junkyard!
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#32
(02-22-2010, 11:12 PM)cyclerUK Wrote:  That's a really great bike.
The frame tubing is "Magni" and is a Japanese tube equivalent to 531. Looking at all the little details you can appreciate how well it's built.
Because it is built with "lugs" then that would limit how small the bike could be made.
Considering it's getting on for 20+ years old, it would satisfy todays version of an Audax bike. ("Audax" and "Sportif" are latest fashion here in the UK.)
I notice it has a triple chainset so should be a bit easier to get up the climbs.
Leave the bike as it is until you have to replace whatever.
Modern stuff such as combined brake/shifters are great for quick shifting gears but that is not what this bike was designed for.
Its role in life is for long comfortable rides over many miles. It also has mudguard eyes so fenders could be fitted for those wet road days.
Talking of water, I see it has a fluted seatpost. I would swap that for a "normal" post as the flutes let rain into the seat tube which leads down to the bottom bracket. (especially with having to have the seat so low)
The bottom bracket will possibly still be the unsealed type so will not like water in there.
The flutes were just a "fashion" and added really nothing to lightness etc.
Concerning the tires- If they have been in the dark all the time then they may still be good?
I would pump them up to a high pressure and see if there are any bulges or rotted sections.
Any concerns then bin them and get new rubber.

Thanks for your comments, and for the suggestion about the seat post. I live in Oregon, which means that it rains now and then Smile so before I take it out on a rainy day, I'll get that post swapped out. I don't plan to "update" anything on the bike; it suits me well as is. I always enjoyed taking it on long rides into the countryside when I lived in eastern Washington, which is (as you noted) exactly what it's built for and how I want to ride it.

As for the tires, they are the originals and yes, they've been in storage along with the bike, never left out in the sun, etc. I aired them up partially a couple of months ago, and they're still holding air, much to my surprise. I haven't pumped them up to full pressure, but they look great. I don't even see any cracks in them. The tubes are original, too, which worries me a little more than the tires.

Patty
(02-23-2010, 07:05 PM)KC-Steve Wrote:  Hi Patty,

That is an awesome bike! If I ever run across one for sale I'll compare it to yours. Smile

Steve

Thanks, Steve. Smile I've seen an ad or two for them, but this model wasn't sold in the US for more than a couple of years, and I don't imagine that there are too many left.

Patty
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#33
Cantilever brakes come on the new Surly LHT touring bikes as well. I know because I have one lol. I always did like cantilever brakes but they cost to much back in my younger days lol. Ok so I am old now or am I ??? Any way I think your bicycle is great bet it will be fun to ride it again.? for all of us is why do we like ridding bicycle so much as a kid then we stop for a while then we get right back in to it again lol. I can say this because I for one done it my self. :-)
One last ? how many speeds does it have I can see to good I guess. But I do like your bike.
My dad always told me a Sledge a matic can fix any thing.
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#34
(02-24-2010, 10:34 PM)Surly LHT Wrote:  Cantilever brakes come on the new Surly LHT touring bikes as well. I know because I have one lol. I always did like cantilever brakes but they cost to much back in my younger days lol. Ok so I am old now or am I ??? Any way I think your bicycle is great bet it will be fun to ride it again.? for all of us is why do we like ridding bicycle so much as a kid then we stop for a while then we get right back in to it again lol. I can say this because I for one done it my self. :-)
One last ? how many speeds does it have I can see to good I guess. But I do like your bike.

It has 18 speeds, though I think I calculated once a long time ago that there are duplicates. At the time, 18 was a lot. Not anymore!

And I agree with you: I almost lived on my bike when I was a kid. Then I did a lot of riding in the early 80s on this bike and then not again until last summer. I just love going out for a ride. Don't know why I ever stopped.
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#35
Fantastic looking bike. I have the same bike. I bought in 1982 or 1983, and rode it from Vancouver B.C. to Winnipeg Manitoba in Canada during the summer of 1983. It never gave me a single problem for the entire ride through all kinds of weather and road conditions.

I still have it, but unfortunately I converted it to various forms through the years, and it's not in great shape now. I WISH I had kept it in the original form that you have, because it would be a good cruiser bike. Although, I might consider moving to a more modern shifting/derailleur system for safer shifting in traffic. I also switched to a "randoneur" (or something like that) handle bars that gave me a little more flexibility for placing my hands on long rides.

Anyway, you're lucky to have such a cool bike. It motivates me to think about restoring mine to closer to original condition.
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#36
(04-13-2010, 06:20 AM)halmagruder Wrote:  Fantastic looking bike. I have the same bike. I bought in 1982 or 1983, and rode it from Vancouver B.C. to Winnipeg Manitoba in Canada during the summer of 1983. It never gave me a single problem for the entire ride through all kinds of weather and road conditions.

I still have it, but unfortunately I converted it to various forms through the years, and it's not in great shape now. I WISH I had kept it in the original form that you have, because it would be a good cruiser bike. Although, I might consider moving to a more modern shifting/derailleur system for safer shifting in traffic. I also switched to a "randoneur" (or something like that) handle bars that gave me a little more flexibility for placing my hands on long rides.

Anyway, you're lucky to have such a cool bike. It motivates me to think about restoring mine to closer to original condition.

Thanks! I've always loved riding it, and when it was in storage for such a long time when I couldn't ride, I thought about selling it once in a while. But I couldn't part with it.

Post a photo of yours, if you want to. I think restoring it would make a great project!

Patty
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#37
I just bought the Japanese made Bianchi Randonneur. It has the nice looking "B" fork so no worries there. I'll try to true a badly out of round rear wheel; failing that put on a pair of tried (and true) 700cc Mavic Pros to keep compatible with my other bikes and a pair of 30mm Panaracer Gran Dios tires that have been waiting for this occassion. I'll likely keep the 6 speed cluster, install new pads, cables, bar tape and regrease every bearing. I need a front rack and frame pump.

I really want to upgrade to a wider handlebar from the original circa 1983 narrow bar.

BTW, I like canti brakes.
Don't worry about avoiding temptation, As you grow older it will avoid you.
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