Bicycle TutorBicycle Tutor

Show off your bike!

Related video tutorials:
Does any one know what weight this drill is ?
#1
I know this is probably a really long shot but so far even dewalt havent replied ( both in the uk & US ,so I guess this must be my lucky month )

Any way Ive seen the following Drill below at a good price somewhere but I'm confused as to what the exact weight is because it mentions its 14 & 6lbs , so which is which ?

( Im assuming 14lbs is with the battery , but then again the drill looks quite large so its hard to tell ) does any one know ??

14 or 6 lbs ??
Reply
#2
I'm not real familiar with DeWalt's cordless drills, but I do know that most manufacturers are now making both a "regular" sized as well as a "compact" size with a smaller battery. The smaller batteries now are using lithium-ion and are as powerful, if not more powerful, than the older nickel cadmium batteries.

My own preference is the Makita lithium-ion 18-volt cordless though. The reviews are better than DeWalt's. And it charges batteries in less than 15 minutes.

Steve
Junkyard Tools rescued from the junkyard!
Reply
#3
thats cool info steve, as its usually more feasible to replace the whole drill than a battery when they go. the smaller batteries are as powerful, but how long do they last on a single charge? i think this would be helpful to melon. sorry i cant help answer the original question about weight.
Get on your bad pedalscooter and ride!
Reply
#4
(11-29-2010, 03:52 PM)KC-Steve Wrote:  I'm not real familiar with DeWalt's cordless drills, but I do know that most manufacturers are now making both a "regular" sized as well as a "compact" size with a smaller battery. The smaller batteries now are using lithium-ion and are as powerful, if not more powerful, than the older nickel cadmium batteries.

My own preference is the Makita lithium-ion 18-volt cordless though. The reviews are better than DeWalt's. And it charges batteries in less than 15 minutes.

Steve

hey steve ( typical ) dewalt got back to me about 90 mins after this post, apparently , though god-knows-why , that 14lbs is the shipping weight of the total case not the drill which really is 6lbs.

I agree about matkia being good but the problem is that all the sites and information ive seen regarding ebikes has been with dewalt , so theres 0 info on gears or anything else whereats at least with places like this xrp drive system

At least if the original idea doesn't work , I also have the option of using their own kits ( if the worst comes to the worst )

I have my uk nano charger now any way for the 2 18v 2 ah nano li-ons i found on ebay for $177 , that should give me some mileage and save the hassle of screwing around with charging / discharging that comes with lipos etc

According to the DPX place you can get 5 miles on battery ( though got no idea if thats nano or reg li-on )

melon
Reply
#5
(11-29-2010, 05:11 PM)X-RAY Wrote:  thats cool info steve, as its usually more feasible to replace the whole drill than a battery when they go. the smaller batteries are as powerful, but how long do they last on a single charge? i think this would be helpful to melon. sorry i cant help answer the original question about weight.

Mine isn't the compact drill but uses lithium-ion batteries. The compacts are usually less voltage than the 18-volt drill. I've seen 9.6v, 12v, and 14v. Some people get confused thinking they are the old style cordless drills because of the voltage used.

Sticking with what I know . . . yup, batteries alone are expensive and you might as well replace the whole drill kit. I was going to mention about battery life, but in all honesty, I have NOT reached a point where the battery is drained to the point of needing to be recharged. I just recharge it now and then, 3 times in the last 8 months, or twice after the initial charge. But during my research of reviews I found that the Makita was driving about 250+ screws before quitting. Much more than others in the test. Smile

Steve
Junkyard Tools rescued from the junkyard!
Reply
#6
wow, hows that for longevity!thanks again steve. i didnt realize there were compacts now, i just looked at the volts and the prices in the catalogs. i need to read more of the descriptions before thinking its not big enough.
Get on your bad pedalscooter and ride!
Reply
#7
I think the compacts were designed to fill the need of not wearing out the user, like a professional who is putting up sheet rock with hundreds of screws. An extra pound or two makes a big difference in a long day of work.

But as heavy as that 18-volt drill is, I don't really get worn out because I'm just a hobby worker. Besides, the 18-volt drill is strong enough to break your arm if not careful.

Steve
Junkyard Tools rescued from the junkyard!
Reply
#8
I found some relevant information about buying cordless drills that everyone might be interested in reading. . .

http://www.ereplacementparts.com/article/3084/Cordless_Power_Tool_Buying_Guide_How_to_Choose_Battery_Type.html

This is good info because my needs are likely different than Melon's or others here from the standpoint of not being under powered, or wasting money on a tool that is beyond your needs. When I bought my Makita it was with the purpose of building a heavy wooden staircase for an outdoor deck on lake property. So I really need a medium or heavy duty drill for that purpose, but for most of my home use it is probably more than I need.

Steve
Junkyard Tools rescued from the junkyard!
Reply
#9
How about this for powering the original device?
http://dpxsystems.com/
Charlie.
Reply
#10
(11-29-2010, 10:54 PM)KC-Steve Wrote:  I found some relevant information about buying cordless drills that everyone might be interested in reading. . .

http://www.ereplacementparts.com/article/3084/Cordless_Power_Tool_Buying_Guide_How_to_Choose_Battery_Type.html

This is good info because my needs are likely different than Melon's or others here from the standpoint of not being under powered, or wasting money on a tool that is beyond your needs. When I bought my Makita it was with the purpose of building a heavy wooden staircase for an outdoor deck on lake property. So I really need a medium or heavy duty drill for that purpose, but for most of my home use it is probably more than I need.

Steve

Well I like the idea of not having to worry about the memory or depth charge with the nanos so i dont have to keep recharging ( that can cost a lot more than the initial cost of the batteries over the long term ) esp if your using the tool a lot.

Does your drill adjustable clutch on it Steve ?

I don't know much about it but someone else on another forum seemed to think i could use that I I could use it to limit the speed , as I'm looking ideally to try to get constant low speed ( 42 rpm min - unloaded ) it would be really useful.

melon
Reply
#11
You kids will be lost when the power goes out. (evil grin)
Wheelies don't pop themselves. (from a QBP fortune cookie)
Reply
#12
(12-03-2010, 03:43 AM)RobAR Wrote:  You kids will be lost when the power goes out. (evil grin)

What kids ?
Reply
#13
Wow a 14 lb drill . NOT! I just weighted my 12V Makita, Nickel Metal Hydrite battery, and its about 5lbs. I also have a 20 year old style Makita with the long 9.6 Ni Cad battery in the handle. Cant kill them. I was going to rent a 1/2" hammer drill to drill holes in cinder block but tried the 12V Makita , like butter wow. The new drill bit helped.

Consumers report in Nov 2009 tested cordless drills and gave high marks to De Walt, Hitachi, Makita and Bosch, Craftsman was OK too.In that order. I see a lot of DeWalts on the job.

At the movie studios lots of guys are getting the small Hitachi or Makita impact drivers with build in light.The new lithium batteries are nice in small occasional use tools, they have good power and weigh maybe 2lbs. Have not seen big lithium drills ones yet.

The cost of replacement batteries should be a consideration in choosing cordless drills. The replacement batteries for my Makita are way too much, considering generic batteries.
Never Give Up!!!
Reply
#14
(12-03-2010, 09:17 PM)GeorgeET Wrote:  Wow a 14 lb drill . NOT! I just weighted my 12V Makita, Nickel Metal Hydrite battery, and its about 5lbs. I also have a 20 year old style Makita with the long 9.6 Ni Cad battery in the handle. Cant kill them. I was going to rent a 1/2" hammer drill to drill holes in cinder block but tried the 12V Makita , like butter wow. The new drill bit helped.

Consumers report in Nov 2009 tested cordless drills and gave high marks to De Walt, Hitachi, Makita and Bosch, Craftsman was OK too.In that order. I see a lot of DeWalts on the job.

At the movie studios lots of guys are getting the small Hitachi or Makita impact drivers with build in light.The new lithium batteries are nice in small occasional use tools, they have good power and weigh maybe 2lbs. Have not seen big lithium drills ones yet.

The cost of replacement batteries should be a consideration in choosing cordless drills. The replacement batteries for my Makita are way too much, considering generic batteries.

Where did you get 14lbs from ?

Any way its just the motor I need , not the whole case , that is if your talking to me .

melon
Reply
#15
From your first post.


"Any way Ive seen the following Drill below at a good price somewhere but I'm confused as to what the exact weight is because it mentions its 14 & 6lbs , so which is which ?"
Never Give Up!!!
Reply
#16
(12-03-2010, 11:48 PM)GeorgeET Wrote:  From your first post.


"Any way Ive seen the following Drill below at a good price somewhere but I'm confused as to what the exact weight is because it mentions its 14 & 6lbs , so which is which ?"

Yes, I was confused sites seemed to be listing the shipping weight i.e. the whole case with 2 batteries etc with the battery rather than drill itself , after all why would u need to know shipping weight if the shipping price was set ???

cheers dear,

melon
Reply
#17
Ye 10 -4 to that. You must be in USA, I did not realize that that was a link to Amazon site.
That is a very serious drill for big construction jobs. Do you do a lot of big construction jobs? It also still uses the old NiCad batteries which have been replaced by NIMH and the latest lithium batteries, as KC pointed out. Both Which do not have a "memory" and can be recharged anytime, not only when fully discharged. Pricey sucker.

As I pointed out replacement battery prices will kill ya. So consider that too.
Never Give Up!!!
Reply
#18
Reminds me of that show "Tim the Toolman"? How he goes over board for the simplest jobs, love that guys humor!
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
Reply
#19
Ye I have seen his show. If you got to carry and use it all day smaller is better.Those small impact drivers from Makita and Hitachi are popular and I have seen even smaller Bosch lithium drills, for driving screws.

IMO they are not as good for drilling.

BTW I worked on the original "Home Improvement" with Tim Allan and Pamela Anderson as tool girl. :-)
Never Give Up!!!
Reply
#20
(12-06-2010, 01:11 AM)GeorgeET Wrote:  Ye I have seen his show. If you got to carry and use it all day smaller is better.Those small impact drivers from Makita and Hitachi are popular and I have seen even smaller Bosch lithium drills, for driving screws.

IMO they are not as good for drilling.

BTW I worked on the original "Home Improvement" with Tim Allan and Pamela Anderson as tool girl. :-)

Were you that neighbor that whose face was never revealed? Lol .
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
Reply


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  Vertical Drill Press uses for bike fab... Bill 2 4,489 11-20-2012, 04:14 AM
Last Post: Bill

Forum Jump:



ISSN 1918-3445 © Copyright 2007-2010 Bicycle Tutor / Privacy Policy / Created by Alex Ramon

feed