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What type of Sears Roebuck do I have?
#1
Hi guys. Pretty new to the bike restoration scene. I saw this diamond in the rough at a garage sale fo 10 bucks. Ive heard there was some money to be made restoring and selling these older bikes. I know shes a Sears-Roebuck and most likely a 1960s. Can anyone tell me any information? Any clues for things to look for? Its got a slightly damaged front and rear fenders (but I took and auto body class so I can handle that) and needs a chain and tires and seat. the rest I should be able to fix (tweaked handlebars with a crack at the bend).
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#2
(06-29-2011, 06:38 AM)Madhttr Wrote:  ...... Ive heard there was some money to be made restoring and selling these older bikes.......
Yeah, by the people selling us parts to do the restoration, not by us selling our work... Smile Sorry to burst your bubble.

(06-29-2011, 06:38 AM)Madhttr Wrote:  Can anyone tell me any information? Any clues for things to look for? Its got a slightly damaged front and rear fenders (but I took and auto body class so I can handle that) and needs a chain and tires and seat. the rest I should be able to fix (tweaked handlebars with a crack at the bend).

The handle bars do not appear to be original. Somewhere on it will be stamped "MADE IN ____" and usually on the underside of the bottom bracket you will find a serial number.

The particular bike you have is not particularly desirable nor collectible. Too many made, no special features.

The only desirable Sears bike that I am aware of was offered in the mid '70's, a ten speed road bike with double butted Reynolds 531 tubing, gold colored, made by Puch in Austria. It was not a great bike, even with the 531 tubing. The bottom bracket was a lot lower than the wheel axles, resulting in pedals hitting the ground with even minor lean angles; and the overall geometry of the frame suffered too. My dad had one. I had a early '70s Sears ten speed, Austrian, cotter less cranks, SunTour VGT derailleur, lugged steel frame - but not at all stiff, very tiring to ride. I wish that I had kept the derailleur, the only decent thing on the bike....
Nigel
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#3
As far as I could tell the handle bars seem original. From what Ive been told this bike is a beach cruiser and beach cruisers are desirable today. She was Made in Austria as well. From what research Ive been able to do these 60s Sears can go for 150 to 1000 (Rough to perfect) but average in the 3-400 dollar range. Im also thinking of trying to find the motorized set up for it if they made one.
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#4
Breeze cruiser not beach my apologies. Could I take the seat to a Hot Rod Upholstery shop to have it redone? (the seat frame is fine and the springs are in good shape) or should I just get a new seat? If so where could I get one? in fact where is a good place for any classic bike parts? If I were to put some options on it that it may have had would it up the value? Since i only spent $10 for the bike i do have some cushion spending room. In your opinion what should I do to it for cheap to up value? I believe it had the license plate because part of a bracket is still on the rear fender.
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#5
could the bracket be for a reflector instead of a plate? I have a schwinn breeze 5 speed 1975 and it has a big reflector on the back of the fender
There are two kinds of people in the world, "Those who help themselves to people, and those who help people!"
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#6
Could be. its a small plate with a bolt through the middle of it. maybe 1.5 inches by .75 inches.
Honestly have to admit this bike could look amazing.
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#7
Hey there! New to this forum!

I run a small bike business, and can assure you that nfmisso is incorrect in this instance. Maybe in California (and/or to bike elitists) the things he said are true, but where I am there is a HIGH demand for this style bicycle on a regular basis. I unfortunately can not help you in determination of what style/model/any more information on the bike you have based solely on that picture, I just wanted to assure you that if you were to fix this bike up you could sell it, and with a $10 investment on the frame, even including the $80-$100 you may have to spend to get it back to sellable condition, you will STILL make profit, especially if you can find the right client.

Vintage girl's cruisers are extremely popular nowadays, and should sell quickly and easily. Be sure to take some coarse steel wool to the rustier parts! Go ahead and get a new suspension saddle, and that will boost the final cost, as well as providing you with a great selling point! If you wanted, offer them the original saddle if they would prefer. Check craigslist in your area for a wheelset, and small shops for budget tires. A local bike shop will have good chains for a decent price, and if they don't you can always get one at a retail, larger shop.
Good luck on your sale!

ohps: the reason I found this particular thread, was that I recently acquired an old Sears Roebuck bike in pretty dirty/bad condition, restored it, and sold it for over $250. I joined the forum primarily to tell YOU, Don't be discouraged my friend! Do what you love and have fun while doing it!

August-
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#8
you should look at what similar bike are actually selling for on eBay and CL - not the asking price.

there are lots of people trying to sell, and not closing the deal.
Nigel
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#9
If you cannot get free shipping on ebay I think it really eats in to the bottom line or really want it bad. But good luck on the project and let us know how ya did
There are two kinds of people in the world, "Those who help themselves to people, and those who help people!"
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#10
(07-09-2011, 02:55 PM)nfmisso Wrote:  you should look at what similar bike are actually selling for on eBay and CL - not the asking price.

there are lots of people trying to sell, and not closing the deal.

Sucks to be them. I don't have any problems moving them, and don't need to look at CL for examples of "selling" vs "asking" prices, as I have personal experience in selling these bikes for substantial profit on a regular basis.
In fact, I can't find enough vintage girl's bikes to sell fast enough here.

Just saying, don't try and discourage the OP from doing what he loves. You made it sound like he was doing something wrong, and like I said, maybe where you are there isn't a market for them, but in other places there is a demanding market for them. I've bought several at more than $50 per frame and made considerable profit on them.


Madhttr: I'm interested to learn how this works out for you! Maybe even post a picture of it refurbished once you get it done! Again, good luck and damn the naysayers! =)
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#11
well for one thing Augustderelict I did not naysay anything. Madhttr will have fun restoring the bicycle and learn a lot along the way. This forum is purely to gain different perspectives from people whom enjoy like things and not bash people for doing so. I can assure you that Mfmisso has the respect of the biketutor community as much as I do respect his opinion. Don't have to totally agree all the time but it does not matter! I consider him family and it probably sucks to be you or anywhere close
There are two kinds of people in the world, "Those who help themselves to people, and those who help people!"
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#12
=D
Thumbs up big guy! You sure told me!! And that's a VERY clever twist to my name! ^_~
ohps I wasn't actually referring to you, but naysayers in general. You must subconsciously consider yourself a naysayer if you took my statement so personally. See, we learn new stuff everyday!
It's highly hilarious/ironic that in the same breath you say this forum isn't about "bashing" people, you say I suck, but don't know anything about me. lol. Thanks- Gave me a good laugh.
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#13
Hey guys we're all friends here, everyone has valid opinions Smile

Madhttr: Very nice bike, looks like the red one my grandpa had behind the barn for us to ride when we visited... brings back memories. Sorry I can't help with more info about the make/model.

As for profiting from restoring it, it depends on so many things. I've seen classics like that sell for good money in urban areas/boutiques, and then for only $10 at garage sales like you found it. They also sell better in some cities than others. It's really a matter of being in the right place at the right time. Nostalgia plays a big part in it.

Personally, I'd only recommend investing time and money into it if you'll enjoy the work. If you end up making money on it that's fantastic, but you'll likely find you get the most out of the personal satisfaction you get with a completed project.

If you do restore it, I hope you'll upload photos along the way!
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#14
(07-10-2011, 12:38 AM)Alex Ramon Wrote:  ...Nostalgia plays a big part in it...

You are absolutely correct! I've found that a main contributing factor to so many of these bikes being sold so quickly, and being so sought after was an emotional attachment to the bike's style, and from a business standpoint, honestly that is the best way to sell something. Get the client/find a client emotionally attached to a product, and they can't do without it! It's also a really good feeling being able to connect someone with something like that, which will constantly remind them of good/great times! =)

I'd like to see refurb photos as well when they are available--
Cheers-
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#15
Thanks for all the info guys! unfortunatly where I live (near Sacramento) CL doesnt have anything close to use as a starting point price wise, neither does Ebay. Would I get top dollar if I sold it to a respectable bike shop?

By the Way I found the Serial numbers: 503.451320 3058402
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#16
(07-16-2011, 06:59 AM)Madhttr Wrote:  Thanks for all the info guys! unfortunatly where I live (near Sacramento) CL doesnt have anything close to use as a starting point price wise, neither does Ebay. Would I get top dollar if I sold it to a respectable bike shop?

Eeeks! I'm sorry to hear that you're in Cali.
More than likely no you will not get what you are looking for from a "respectable" bike shop in California, seeing as said bike shop will low-ball you to death because they are only interested in Profit Margins.
Unless you can re-construct that bike for about $50, you will be losing money is what it sounds like to me.

Good luck though Hatter!
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#17
Il take it to a few car shows with a for sale sign on it, put it on craigslist and ebay.
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#18
(06-29-2011, 07:17 PM)nfmisso Wrote:  
(06-29-2011, 06:38 AM)Madhttr Wrote:  ...... Ive heard there was some money to be made restoring and selling these older bikes.......
Yeah, by the people selling us parts to do the restoration, not by us selling our work... Smile Sorry to burst your bubble.

(06-29-2011, 06:38 AM)Madhttr Wrote:  Can anyone tell me any information? Any clues for things to look for? Its got a slightly damaged front and rear fenders (but I took and auto body class so I can handle that) and needs a chain and tires and seat. the rest I should be able to fix (tweaked handlebars with a crack at the bend).

The handle bars do not appear to be original. Somewhere on it will be stamped "MADE IN ____" and usually on the underside of the bottom bracket you will find a serial number.

The particular bike you have is not particularly desirable nor collectible. Too many made, no special features.

The only desirable Sears bike that I am aware of was offered in the mid '70's, a ten speed road bike with double butted Reynolds 531 tubing, gold colored, made by Puch in Austria. It was not a great bike, even with the 531 tubing. The bottom bracket was a lot lower than the wheel axles, resulting in pedals hitting the ground with even minor lean angles; and the overall geometry of the frame suffered too. My dad had one. I had a early '70s Sears ten speed, Austrian, cotter less cranks, SunTour VGT derailleur, lugged steel frame - but not at all stiff, very tiring to ride. I wish that I had kept the derailleur, the only decent thing on the bike....

I agree with Nigel here, for the most part. But I just wanted to add a couple of things. The economy is stagnate these days because of uncertainty about the future and I think THAT best explains the lack of demand overall. And those handle bars did NOT originally come on that bike. They are the Sting Ray style, exclusive to the Sting Ray bike or other derivatives.

Another thing that is important to know, more often than not, when a good deal shows up on Craigslist it is usually sold and deleted rather quickly, so what you see listed are the ones that aren't selling. If you can't find a similar bike listed then it is possible they are getting picked up and deleted as quickly as they are listed. You really have to watch Craigslist religiously to really see the items in demand. Smile

Steve
Junkyard Tools rescued from the junkyard!
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#19
Yep good point, I thought for sure that AugustDerleth would make me an offer on my Schwinn Breeze 5spd. But nope it just hangs there lonely and wants a good home. I may just take it to the poor side of town and give it to a little girl who doesn't have a bicycle so maybe just maybe there will be a special place in hell for me someday
There are two kinds of people in the world, "Those who help themselves to people, and those who help people!"
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#20
Where are you August that these bikes are in hi demand?? Here in sunny California bikes, motorcycles and cars stay in great shape, no winters, no salt on the road, so we are picky and buy nice ones.

Bikes like this one sell everywhere for around $25-$50. Come on buy and load your truck at Salvation army store. I just picked up a Sears by Murray for my wife for $30 at Salvation Army. Got a senior discount. :-))) Made in USA (IIRC Tennessee) and good cosmetically.

http://losangeles.craigslist.org/lgb/bik/2498384827.html

http://losangeles.craigslist.org/wst/bik/2497325409.html

http://losangeles.craigslist.org/lgb/bik/2491749572.html

http://losangeles.craigslist.org/search/bik?query=sears&srchType=A&minAsk=&maxAsk=

More than I expected but lets see if they sell. ANND clean.

As been said restore as a hobby for fun , parts are very hard to find. Mostly not available. Thinking that bike can fetch as much as $1000.00 is a pipe dream. People think if its old its got to be valuable. Watch antique road show and learn that only high end keeps value. BUT there is a fool born everyday if you got time to wait for one.

If you are interested in Craig list look in other cities for prices or ebay ball park figures. I have only seen high end vintage pristine bikes get reasonably good prices. Like the Schwinn Paramount Racers. Its the selling price that counts.

BTW you all add location to your bio, it helps.
Never Give Up!!!
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