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Replacement rims for Roadmaster Mt. Fury 26" Mountain bike?
#1
I need to replace the rear wheel rim on my Roadmaster Mt. Fury 26" men's mountain bike. The current tire size used is 26", 1.75" width. Can someone suggest a source for the replacment rim? Also, would I have to replace the 5 sprocket cassette at the same time, or can I use the one I have?

Thank you,
Josephine
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#2
You are better off simply replacing the wheel rather than lacing a new rim onto it. Without knowing exactly what you have, but having replaced many wheels on Roadmasters, I would expect that you can purchase a wheel for ~$50. $50 is where my LABOR ONLY begins for wheelbuilding. Then you still have to purchase the rim and possibly spokes.
The sprocket can be removed from your current wheel and installed on the new one by any bike shop.
Wheelies don't pop themselves. (from a QBP fortune cookie)
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#3
Thanks. The specific model I have is r4416wmgt. I guess I should have said wheel earlier rather than just the rim as, yes, the wheel itself needs replaced. I see all sorts of wheels on Amazon, but wasn't sure which ones would be suitable. If possible, I'd like something stronger than the originals. Appreciate any further suggestions.
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#4
Ok, not ever having replaced a wheel before, I became a little confused over the size. When we are looking at replacing the entire rear wheel, I assume we are coming up with our dimensions from the tire size and not the actual rim size, is this correct? My tire is marked 26x1.75 and that's the wheels I see on Amazon and others. If I measure the rim itself though, it's only maybe 23" diameter and 1.2" or so width. Just wanted to be sure.

This having 5 sprockets, I am trying to narrow down a suitable wheel. Would any of these be suitable? http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Dsporting&field-keywords=26+x+1.75+wheel+rear

If so, which ones? If not or there are other recommendations, would appreciate it. I do want to get a better wheel than the one that was on the bike originally.

Thanks again,
Josephine
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#5
Hi Josephine:

Get this one:
http://www.amazon.com/Wheel-Master-2-125-Silver-Spokes/dp/B000AO3G52/ref=sr_1_6?s=cycling&ie=UTF8&qid=1353262238&sr=1-6&keywords=26+x+1.75+wheel+rear+12

It has thicker spokes (stronger) than the original wheel and alloy rim.

Also, please note that you have freewheel, not a cassette. As mentioned, it can be removed quite easily with the correct tool. Installation does not require a tool.

If you want to replace the freewheel; this one is a good one:
http://www.amazon.com/Sunrace-Freewheel-14-28T-5-Speed-Black/dp/B000AYB57S/ref=sr_1_2?s=cycling&ie=UTF8&qid=1353262554&sr=1-2

If you choose to replace the freewheel; you should replace the chain at the same time.
Nigel
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#6
Nfmisso, thanks for the link. While I'm at it, I think I'll also need the rim strip or can I use the one from the old wheel? One last thing, can someone recommend a spoke wrench that will fit both these spokes and the ones from the original wheel, since that is what I still have on the front? I tried *almart's "universal" spoke wrench, but none of the wrenches would fit.

Josephine
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#7
Hi Josephine;

Rim tape of some sort is required. Everyone has their favorite. I like mono-filament strapping tape. I trim it to width, and put down two layers. Rim strips are cheap, do not re-use - the cost of a tube is much higher.

I use thorn resistant tubes and tire liners, because as a bicycle commuter I would rather go a little slower than have to deal with flats.

Spoke wrenches - have to measure the nipples, then purchase a wrench or wrenches to suit.
Nigel
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#8
(11-18-2012, 06:29 PM)nfmisso Wrote:  I use thorn resistant tubes and tire liners, because as a bicycle commuter I would rather go a little slower than have to deal with flats.

What brand tires/ tubes do you use? Thanks.
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#9
Currently I am using Avenir tubes - but have had some quality issues with failures around the valve stems - so I am looking.

Liners - Stop Flats 2. I have used SLIME brand liners; they are thicker, have a noticeable thump once per revolution, and have a sharp edge that will puncture thin tubes.

Tires; I use tires with Kevlar belts in the tread. I like Kenda and Bell brand tires.
Nigel
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#10
I've been using the Bell brand too. I can't recall the tubes, but they're supposed to be resistant to puncture.

One drawback that I'm having though is that the tires don't seem to last very long, especially the rear one. Riding 4-5 days/ week @ 17 mi, I haven't gotten more than 4 months out of the rear tires, about 8-9 months for the front. Granted, I am riding a mountain bike on the road, so probably getting a lot of extra wear, but I am surprised how quickly the tires start to show threading, etc.

I only use the bike for exercise and managed to lose 65 lbs in a year riding it. It wasn't easy and most people on road bikes pass me like I'm sitting there, but my rides don't have to be very long to get benefit. Just wish the tires lasted longer. One person told me the other day to consider switching to road bike tires, but I would think that would make the riding easier and I'd have to ride longer, but not sure.

Josephine
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#11
hi Josephine;

Mountain bike tires will not last very long on pavement. You may want to try the Bell brand 26x1.75 tires.
Nigel
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#12
Josephine, mind if I asked for archival purposes if you have a picture or link to a picture of your Roadmaster?
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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#13
How can you tell which rear wheel to use if you don't know the rear hub width? An old 5 or 6 speed MTB frame is going to be 126mm isn't it?
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#14
(11-19-2012, 05:26 AM)1FJEF Wrote:  How can you tell which rear wheel to use if you don't know the rear hub width? An old 5 or 6 speed MTB frame is going to be 126mm isn't it?

Hi Jeff; They are not that old.
Nigel
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#15
(11-19-2012, 03:42 AM)Bill Wrote:  Josephine, mind if I asked for archival purposes if you have a picture or link to a picture of your Roadmaster?

I don't have any personal pictures available, but here is a link to the store picture:

http://i.walmartimages.com/i/p/00/03/86/75/44/0003867544465_500X500.jpg

(You probably wouldn't want to see mine anyway. It sat for nearly 10 years before I started using it and has numerous areas of rust, especially around the sprockets which are going to be my next replacements.)
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#16
Hi Josephine,

I'm guessing from the picture that the Roadmaster wasn't an expensive bike to start with. If you're going to be replacing wheels, tyres, cassette, chain etc. you'll probably end up spending what the bike originally cost again.

If you're riding 60+ miles a week, have you thought about replacing the whole bike with a better one, you're doing enough miles to justify one. Smile

You could also consider something more suitable for your rides, if your mainly on road, but don't want a full on racer with drop bars, consider something like a hybrid bike, this should be a lot less effort to ride on the road, but with suitable tyres will be happy on light trails and unmade tracks as well:

[Image: specialized-sirrus-comp-disc-2013-hybrid-bike.jpg]

If you're looking for a good mixed terrain tyre, try Schwalbe Hurricanes: http://www.schwalbetires.com/bike_tires/off-road_tires/hurricane, they're semi slick, so they roll well on tarmac, but the knobbly side tread makes them OK off-road provided it's not too wet or muddy.

Lastly, congratulations, dropping 65lbs in a year is good going. I'm on a bit of a weight loss regime myself, lost about 33lbs so far and reckon I need to lose another 30 to 40 to get down to my fighting weight. Smile

Owen.
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#17
(11-19-2012, 03:20 PM)xerxes Wrote:  Hi Josephine,

I'm guessing from the picture that the Roadmaster wasn't an expensive bike to start with. If you're going to be replacing wheels, tyres, cassette, chain etc. you'll probably end up spending what the bike originally cost again.

Quite true. It was around $85 US when purchased nearly 10 years ago.

Quote:If you're riding 60+ miles a week, have you thought about replacing the whole bike with a better one, you're doing enough miles to justify one. Smile

Yes, I have thought about that for a while. The firm on Amazon said the new tire wouldn't be here until next week, so I found and visited the closest bike shop to me which was about 25 mi away. They had basically the same tire as recommended in this thread, so I told them to go ahead and replace it. While there, I asked them about equivalent bikes of more quality and they said they started around $300 US. So maybe this Spring, I will consider it. Right now, being holiday time especially, most funding is going elsewhere.

Quote:
You could also consider something more suitable for your rides, if your mainly on road, but don't want a full on racer with drop bars, consider something like a hybrid bike, this should be a lot less effort to ride on the road, but with suitable tyres will be happy on light trails and unmade tracks as well:

[Image: specialized-sirrus-comp-disc-2013-hybrid-bike.jpg]

If you're looking for a good mixed terrain tyre, try Schwalbe Hurricanes: http://www.schwalbetires.com/bike_tires/off-road_tires/hurricane, they're semi slick, so they roll well on tarmac, but the knobbly side tread makes them OK off-road provided it's not too wet or muddy.

Lastly, congratulations, dropping 65lbs in a year is good going. I'm on a bit of a weight loss regime myself, lost about 33lbs so far and reckon I need to lose another 30 to 40 to get down to my fighting weight. Smile

Owen.

Thanks for the tires recommendation. Perhaps I will look at this in the future. While visiting the bike shop, I told them I averaged around 11.5 mph on this bike on the roads and they were surprised that I could even do that. With the combination of the heavy frame, knobby tires and the fact that I keep it in a middle gear, it's a tough ride, but the only way I knew how to get closest to the workouts I used to get from speed walking.

Josephine
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#18
Jo. You know what? You Rock! Ride On!
Wheelies don't pop themselves. (from a QBP fortune cookie)
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#19
Pedaling your current bike will give that workout Wink . Congrats glad all worked out fine!
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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#20
Since Christmas is approaching (along with winter and unfavourable road conditions)
- go and tell your relatives of the bike replacement plans
- start looking for a bike soon: most shops are currently putting this year's bikes on sale and great bargains can be had! In spring it might be too late and the bike shops are really busy - everybody buys the new bike in spring. In winter they might put in some "extras", too, or at least give you a good deal on a new lock or somesuch.
- oh, and definitely consider buying the bike from the store (if they treated you well and seemed knowledgeable and stuff) + it is always good to be a known customer at your local bike shop in case something brakes you cannot / don't want to do yourself...

Concerning the exercise: Well, if you ride faster you "simply" increase the mileage to end up with the same time and training effect, it is great to start exploring the area this way! When I was still commuting by bike I ended up riding longer detours on the way back home to train (sometimes getting lost on the way = even more training)... now I cannot commute by bike any more (>85km one way...). Oh, and losing 30kg in one year is great, congrats on that! Keep up the work! Also think about increasing the cadence (how fast you pedal) to reduce stress on the knees (don't know if this applies to you but it is a safe bet, most people pedal too slowly).

My bike replacement / maintenance money raising works like this: I put 0.20 €/km I ride (at the current exchange rate I guess about 40¢/mile?) in a piggy bank (actually it's a tiger not a piggy, but the principle is the same). The money is then used for replacement parts and hopefully a new bike at some point in the not too distant future.
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