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#21
(07-24-2014, 09:03 AM)daniel1988 Wrote:  ... if i make a plan can I show it to you?
Yes.
(07-24-2014, 09:03 AM)daniel1988 Wrote:  ...... shimano un52,but it doesn't say the length of it.
You will need to measure it; or remove it - sometimes it will provide the dimensions on the housing.
(07-24-2014, 09:03 AM)daniel1988 Wrote:  .......,all the expensive ones take a hollowtech.
Not true.
(07-24-2014, 09:03 AM)daniel1988 Wrote:  ......when you make a plan what does it consist of,do you do it on paper or pc,thanks.
Paper, PC, post it notes, white board, black board - whatever.

Start with the start: describe (list) what you have.

Next what is the goal of the project. Actually, for these first two items, either one can be first; BOTH are required before proceeding.

Total budget (parts, tools, labor hours, calendar time, etc)

What is the focus of the build, rank these (there can only be one most important): reliability, light weight, ruggedness, appearance, minimal cost, special function(s)

List out every item and process required to get from the start to the goal.

For each item on list:
* cost of the part(s).
* tools required - need to purchase/rent/borrow? cost.
* estimate of time required.

Sum up the costs, and compare to the budget numbers. Adjust as required.

Regarding the M131/M171 Shimano crank sets. They are very low cost (about the same a single chain ring), and are as rugged as any Shimano offers. They have steel chain rings which will out last just about everything else on a bike. They are heavier than others (only downside). They are a very good choice if you do not want to worry about your crank set.

My projects are all reliability first. I do not want to do repairs one my rides.
Nigel
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#22
(07-24-2014, 03:26 PM)daniel1988 Wrote:  you are probably right, the bike won't be as good as if purchased brand new, but how else will I learn than to attempt a build myself.

You have already learned by just owning a bike and maintaining/upgrading it, as you yourself point out. Learning how to build from scratch is only useful if you have a purpose to the build itself. In 20 years in the bike biz I never built a bike from scratch, though I once combined two into one

I would add one more criteria/purpose to Nigel's list and that is fit. When I purchased my current bike I ordered it stock and then changed out every part of the "cockpit" - bars, stem, saddle and pedals - to meet my preferences and body. Fit is a huge factor in customizing a bike.
I was referring to your knowledge about the factors in building a bike, not general maintenance. You've learned plenty by just maintaining and upgrading your current bike. There's little to gain with a build when there's no clear purpose/benefit to it. But as I said, go for it. I'm checking out of this thread.

I would add one factor that Nigel did not mention, and that is fit/comfort. It's critical to address the "cockpit" when one has the opportunity to customize, though I have done so previously by purchasing a stock bike and then changing bars, stem, saddle and pedals.
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#23
(07-24-2014, 05:28 PM)cny-man Wrote:  
(07-24-2014, 03:26 PM)daniel1988 Wrote:  you are probably right, the bike won't be as good as if purchased brand new, but how else will I learn than to attempt a build myself.

You have already learned by just owning a bike and maintaining/upgrading it, as you yourself point out. Learning how to build from scratch is only useful if you have a purpose to the build itself. In 20 years in the bike biz I never built a bike from scratch, though I once combined two into one

I would add one more criteria/purpose to Nigel's list and that is fit. When I purchased my current bike I ordered it stock and then changed out every part of the "cockpit" - bars, stem, saddle and pedals - to meet my preferences and body. Fit is a huge factor in customizing a bike.
I was referring to your knowledge about the factors in building a bike, not general maintenance. You've learned plenty by just maintaining and upgrading your current bike. There's little to gain with a build when there's no clear purpose/benefit to it. But as I said, go for it. I'm checking out of this thread.

I would add one factor that Nigel did not mention, and that is fit/comfort. It's critical to address the "cockpit" when one has the opportunity to customize, though I have done so previously by purchasing a stock bike and then changing bars, stem, saddle and pedals.

Okay I Understand it's a lot easier to buy a built bike then customise it, I will definitely stick to that in the future. just one more question, you was in the bike biz for 20 years and was never required to build one from scratch, who builds them from scratch first then before they came to you? and where do they get the knowledge to do that, thanks. Sorry for rambling on and on in this thread, your replies are much valued, thanks again.
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#24
(07-24-2014, 06:48 PM)daniel1988 Wrote:  you was in the bike biz for 20 years and was never required to build one from scratch, who builds them from scratch first then before they came to you? and where do they get the knowledge to do that, thanks. Sorry for rambling on and on in this thread, your replies are much valued, thanks again.

I did build a few bikes from scratch for customers over the years, but every bike I purchased for myself new was assembled first in a factory and then finished in a bike shop, with the exception of two bikes. A 1986 Cannondale that I assembled in the shop where I worked and my current bike, which was shipped to me and I did the final assembly. I only made the changes required to adjust fit and to reflect some equipment preferences.
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#25
My bikes are mid '70's to mid '90's vintage frames. My main commuters are my SR Sierra Sport, Schwinn World Tourist and GT. The Schwinn is the only one that I started with as a complete ready to ride bike from a shop. Now only the fork, headset, frame, FD, front shifter and cable are original. The SR and GT both started out similar to the Kona you are getting.

Our Trek T50 tandem was modified before we purchased it; and I have done many additional changes.

I have a very clear idea of what I want (and that changes with time); and how to get from a starting point to the goal in each case.
Nigel
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#26
Never thought about getting old enough that folks would consider 90's "vintage!"
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#27
I really do not know when the proper "Vintage" term should apply. But i kinda use a 15 to 20 year guideline when it comes to say Genera specific types of bicycles. which one normally would not think of as dependable daily rides. But I beg to differ and prove otherwise. The newest bike that I have in my personal stable is a 1997. I still find for me anyway late 80"s to mid 90"s bikes, mountain, Hybrid, or Road bikes of this era to be excellent bikes. still today, in the mid to upper range of the day. "Steel is Real". Racing bikes are one thing, real world users are another. If you look at the trends today, I think it is funny how top brands are sneaking back in CroMo bikes, low key like it is something new again. Can not they not just say "oops" to the regular people that really matter? Ha
I will take a sweet 93" model and dump a $1000 in it without batting an eye, does not bother me a bit. You can have all the hydra whatever formed crap you want, new now. I already know what it will be like 20 years from now, "Rare!". Whatever!
There are two kinds of people in the world, "Those who help themselves to people, and those who help people!"
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#28
Nothing like lugged or fillet brazed double butted Cro-Mo or Reynolds 531 Smile
Nigel
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#29
(07-25-2014, 12:37 AM)nfmisso Wrote:  Nothing like lugged or fillet brazed double butted Cro-Mo or Reynolds 531 Smile

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Its true I though aluminum was the way to go. But my quad butted steel 1985 Fuji was an eye opener. It just wants to sprint. Nice and lively.
One good thing about aluminum is that it does not rust and is stiff for climbs. Good for mountain bikes IMO.......
(07-25-2014, 12:37 AM)nfmisso Wrote:  Nothing like lugged or fillet brazed double butted Cro-Mo or Reynolds 531 Smile

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Its true I though aluminum was the way to go. But my quad butted steel 1985 Fuji was an eye opener. It just wants to sprint. Nice and lively.
One good thing about aluminum is that it does not rust and is stiff for climbs. Good for mountain bikes IMO.......
Never Give Up!!!
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#30
(07-24-2014, 10:19 PM)nfmisso Wrote:  My bikes are mid '70's to mid '90's vintage frames. My main commuters are my SR Sierra Sport, Schwinn World Tourist and GT. The Schwinn is the only one that I started with as a complete ready to ride bike from a shop. Now only the fork, headset, frame, FD, front shifter and cable are original. The SR and GT both started out similar to the Kona you are getting.

Our Trek T50 tandem was modified before we purchased it; and I have done many additional changes.

I have a very clear idea of what I want (and that changes with time); and how to get from a starting point to the goal in each case.

Okay,Do you have any pictures of your bikes I can look at, and what kind of set up do you have on them,gears etc? Also what exactly is a tourist bike?I'm not that familiar with different model types other whether its a mountain,hybrid or racing bike lol (noob) thanks for your help,I'm subscribed to this site now
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#31
(07-25-2014, 03:08 AM)daniel1988 Wrote:  Okay,Do you have any pictures of your bikes I can look at, and what kind of set up do you have on them,gears etc? ....
Yes. take a look at the three links that I gave you previously. You can also search for my other threads in that section. I have been rather negligent with updates the past couple of years though Sad

If there is a specific one, two or three you want to know about, let me know.
Nigel
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